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News and Events

 

 

Oliver Botar brings László Moholy-Nagy back to Berlin

 

December 15th 2014

 

Kevin Burns

 

Sensing the Future Book CoverOliver BotarShortly before University of Manitoba art-historian Oliver Botar left Winnipeg for the opening of Sensing the Future: László Moholy-Nagy, the Media and the Arts, the exhibition he curated for Berlin’s Bauhaus Archiv Museum für Gestaltung, he spoke to CHEF website contributor Kevin Burns.

 

“In his artistic work and experimental use of new media, the avant-gardist and Bauhaus teacher László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946) overstepped the boundaries of the conventional view of art. His methods were marked by interdisciplinary approaches, while at the same time fundamentally questioning the traditional perception of art. His approach was thus far ahead of his time and was already raising issues that are still relevant today.”

 

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Le grand cahier – A nagy füzet –The Notebook

 

November 10th 2014

 

Kevin Burns

 

When a feature film based on a novel by a Hungarian-born author who fled that country in 1956 was scheduled at the local cinema, the CHEF website decided to take a closer look.


Agota Kristof

Source: UNHCR


The 2013 film, A nagy füzet, is an adaptation of the novel Le grand Cahier written in French by Agota Kristof and published in 1986 in her adopted country since 1956: Switzerland. The novel follows the experiences of twin boys who are packed off to the presumed safety of their grandmother’s farm outside a village as war rages all around. Far from being protected, the young boys are surrounded by violence and they witness first-hand how in order to survive terrible choices are involved. The film removes much of the intentional ambiguity of the original novel and sets the action clearly in Hungary during the Second World War.


Directed by János Szász, the film was Hungary’s entry in last year’s Academy Awards. It is an adaptation of the first novel in a trilogy by Agota Kristof who was born in Hungary in 1935. She fled to Switzerland in 1956 and lived there until her death in 2011. She wrote in French, not Hungarian. After “The Notebook” came “Proof” in 1988, and then in 1991, “The Third Lie.” Kristof did not live to see this film version of her first novel, she died in 2011.

 

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Canada-Hungary Educational Foundation board discusses upcoming programs

 

September 23rd 2014

 

Christopher Adam

 

The Ottawa-based Canada-Hungary Educational Foundation's board held its autumn planning meeting on September 9th, 2014 to review some of its work over the past year and to chart a direction moving forward.


Now in its ninth year of existence, there was agreement that scholarship and internship programs should continue to form an important part of CHEF's work, especially building on several years’ worth of experience partnering with the "Thinking Canada" study tour and supporting university students arriving to Canada from Hungary. Read more...

 

 

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Montreal Hungarian community unveils WWI internment plaque

 

August 22nd 2014

 

Christopher Adam

 

On August 22nd, 2014, one hundred plaques commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the internment of Eastern Europeans by Canadian authorities between 1914 and 1920 were unveiled in communities across the country. Our Lady of Hungary Parish in Montreal unveiled one such plaque, remembering the victims of wartime xenophobia, some of whom were of Hungarian origin.

 

Internment Plaque in Montreal

 

Among those present were Fr. Szabolcs Licskó, pastor at Our Lady of Hungary Parish, Gyula Szentmihályi, Hungary's honorary consul in Montreal, Tibor Kelemen, chair of the Hungarian Committee of Montreal, Júlia Ciamarra, Parish Council chair and historian Christopher Adam, an adviser for the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund and member of its Endowment Council between 2008 and 2012. Read more...

 

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One Last Time – An exhibition of works by Tavi Weisz is a first for Ottawa’s Karsh-Masson Gallery

 

December 13th 2013

 

Kevin Burns


After years of uncertainty, Ottawa’s city managed Karsh-Masson Gallery has a new home inside City Hall. To mark this new beginning in its new permanent surroundings, the gallery has assembled a collection of new works by the Romanian born, Hungarian trained, and Ottawa based visual artist, Tavi Weisz.


Mayor Watson unveils Tavi's workAssisted by Ottawa mayor Jim Watson, Weisz pulled back the curtain at the official opening on Thursday December 12th 2013. They then invited the crowd to enter the new gallery and take a closer look at the paintings that comprise One Last Time.


The gallery walls are a subdued pink, a colour chosen by Weisz, as he explained in a brief interview inside the crowded gallery, “to draw out all those pink tones on these canvases.”


The works are large. They reference totalitarianism and a troubled European past. And they depict an often naked human frailty. Read more...

 

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Arrogance or Bias?

 

A conversation with Andrew Griffith, Canada’s former Director General of Multiculturalism and author of the recently published Policy Arrogance or Innocent Bias.

 

December 1st, 2013

 

Kevin Burns

 

"Canada welcomed thousands of refugees from Communist oppression, including about 37,000 who escaped Soviet tyranny in Hungary in 1956. With the Communist victory in the Vietnam War in 1975, many Vietnamese fled, including over 50,000 who sought refuge in Canada.

The idea of multiculturalism, as a result of 19th- and 20th-century immigration, gained a new impetus."

From Discover Canada – The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship, Canada’s official citizenship study guide.


Andrew GriffithIn 2007, Andrew Griffith was named Director General of Multiculturalism and began working with Minister Jason Kenney, a position he held for four years. Griffith looks back on that experience in his book, Policy Arrogance or Innocent Bias, his analytical case study of the complex working dynamic between public servants and politicians. He experienced the tumultuous transition during the shift from a Liberal to a Conservative federal government and shows how existing programs and new policies challenge the way public servants and politicians go about doing their work.

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In pursuit of diplomacy: Miklós Horváth is “Thinking Canada”

 

September 20th, 2013

 

Kevin Burns

 

Miklos HorvathThe young residents had a tough time with Tan Dun’s mysterious soundscapes but warmed up to the more accessible folky jazz of the Elemér Balázs Group. During his two-month internship at a residential youth rehabilitation centre in Elora, Ontario, Miklós Horváth gave a number of presentations on Hungarian and European culture. He thought that using examples of world music might be a good starting point so he chose some Youtube clips to play to his young charges. “They were quiet for a long time after,” he said. Several days later they told him what they really thought about the music, and when his internship came to an end they said even more. “They organized a goodbye session for me and that was so special because in that kind of institution when people leave they are just released. You do not see them again. They each came up to me and told me something they liked. It was very embarrassing. You know how Hungarians don’t like it when people say nice things about them.” (I don’t, but I’ll take his word for it.)

 

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More empathy, more compassion, and more connection

Natalie Feheregyhazi and Toronto’s Apuka Theatre rework a classic Strindberg play

 

August 26, 2013

 

Kevin Burns


One hundred and twenty five years ago, in August 1888, in the expectation of negative audience reaction, August Strindberg tried to explain what he was trying to achieve with his new play, “Miss Julie.” In the Preface of the published edition he wrote: “I have not tried to accomplish anything new but merely to modernize the form according to what I believe are the demands a contemporary audience would make of this art.” Today, this same commitment to adapting a traditional art form in order to engage contemporary audiences is what drives Natalie Feheregyhazi’s reworking of Strindberg’s controversial play. She is not interested in recreating theatre as a museum piece. Instead, she wants to stage an intense theatre event outside the traditional confines of a conventional theatre.

 

This new production, by Toronto’s Apuka Theatre, keeps the play in the nineteenth century but has modified the title – “Lady Julie” – to underline the importance of class and status and their influence on the various “upstairs/downstairs” members of Miss/Lady Julie’s household. The location for this production is not a performing arts space but the Georgian-style Campbell House, built in 1822, the oldest surviving structure from the pre-Toronto Town of York, and which now operates as a community museum. Read more...

 

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@ the Edge. The 2013 conference of the Hungarian Studies Association of Canada

 

May 29th 2013

 

Kevin Burns

 

When Canada’s academics, scholars, and researchers in the Humanities and Social Sciences meet in Victoria, B.C., June 1- 8, they will be gathering “at the edge” in more ways than one. They not only meet in Canada’s most westerly university, but their focus will be the “edgy” theme selected for this year’s Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, an event now known as “the Congress” and that once went by the weighty title, “the Learneds.”

 

“The theme of ‘@ the edge’,” as the national organizers explain on the Congress website, “reflects the University of Victoria’s geographical position in Canada and on the Pacific Rim, as well as the need to centre the periphery both institutionally and socially, testing the boundaries of disciplines, promoting innovative thinking, seeking relevance to both local and global communities, and committing to engaged scholarship and knowledge mobilization.

 

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Translating Canada in Central Europe

 

May 26th 2013

 

Book Review - Ágnes Vashegyi MacDonald, PhD, Columbia College Vancouver

 

BookcoverCanada in Eight Tongues. Translating Canada in Central Europe/Le Canada en huit langues. Traduire le Canada en Europe central, edited by Katalin Kürtösi of the University of Szeged, is a collective effort of eight Central European nations’ scholars. The volume contains 25 articles regarding the dissemination and reception of Canadian literature in translation in Central Europe. Scholars from Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, and Bulgaria, specializing in Canadian Studies, shed light on Canada’s literary and cultural output, as Kürtösi explains, in order for a “wider readership to obtain information about the presence of the Canadian imagination and knowledge and writing about that country in the Central European region” (9). Canada’s official languages, English and French, unite eight languages of Central Europe. A loose historico-political periodization exposes readers to the Canadian poetry, prose, theatre, film, music, women authors, anthologies, theory, and criticism that have become part of the translated canon. Read more...

 

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Still looking for the other half
Tamas Dobozy on his literary life after Siege 13

 

May 6, 2013

 

Kevin Burns

 

Tamas Dobozy is fascinated by four key moments in Hungarian history because of the way he thinks they continue to inform the present. He says they are four powerful elements of a history that is still very much alive today and that when he writes he is in a dialogue with that history. Dobozy’s historical “quartet” begins in 1920 and the Treaty of Trianon’s imposition of rigid restrictions on the former Austro-Hungarian empire that also re-drew Hungary’s borders. Next, it’s the Red Army’s “bloody Siege” of 1944 and the subject of Siege 13, for which he was nominated for a Governor General’s Literary Award and for which he also received the 2013 Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize. Then it’s the 1956 Revolution and, finally, the fall of the Berlin wall and the resulting withdrawal of Soviet Armies from Eastern and Central Europe. “

 

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Coach Lenke Szathmary dies at 92

 

April 12th 2013

 

Lenke Szathmary (Legany)The Canadian women’s gymnastics world has lost one of its pioneers. Lenke Szathmary (Legany) has died at the age of 92. She was for many years the gymnastics coach at St. Catharines Collegiate.


Born in Hungary, Lenke Szathmary, survived the challenges of what turned out to be a 6-year sojourn in a German DP camp before she was able to emigrate to Canada in 1951. She made Welland her home. After working on a farm and then in a factory on a sewing machine, Szathmary eventually managed to have her Hungarian credentials recognized.

 

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"New Lives” – an exhibition of 50 portraits of Hungarian Canadians by V. Tony Hauser commissioned by the National Arts Centre of Canada

 


We are pleased to present once again on our site “New Lives,” a special exhibit created by the National Arts Centre of Canada (NAC) in 2006 to mark the 50th anniversary of the arrival of about 38,000 Hungarian refugees to Canada in 1956-57. The NAC, which played a leading role in the National Capital Region in organizing celebrations for the anniversary, commissioned 50 portraits of Hungarian Canadians from diverse fields of endeavour by renowned Canadian portrait photographer V. Tony Hauser. The exhibition of the portraits, with accompanying texts written by the 50 individuals, was presented with historical panels prepared by the Library and Archives Canada (LAC), and was opened on October 4th 2006 at the NAC as the first in a series of commemorative events. The opening included a recital by Canadian pianist Mary Kenedi in front of an audience that included several of the portrait sitters. The exhibition travelled to a number of locations in 2006-7 both in Canada and abroad (including Hungary) and forms part of the permanent collection of LAC. It has also been on display at the new Canadian Immigration Museum at Pier 21 in Halifax.

 

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Fragile But Important Links

 

January 12, 2013

 

Kevin Burns

 

Eszter SzenciEszter Szenczi arrived in Canada to see first-hand a culture she had only read about in books back home in Hungary. She was one of 32 European graduate students who took part in the 2012 Thinking Canada study tour of Canada.

 

Thinking Canada is an initiative of the European Commission and Canada, jointly funded for the last several years by the EU and by Canada’s Foreign Affairs and Human Resource and Social Development departments.

 

 

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Tamàs Dobozy wins the 2012 Rogers Writers Trust Award

 

November 14 2012

Tamas Dobozy

Photo courtesy of Thomas Allen Publishing


Kevin Burns

 

After winning this year’s Rogers Writers’ Trust award for fiction, Tamàs Dobozy was declared in the press “a surprise favourite” to also win the Governor General’s Literary Award for his book: Siege 13. This is his fictional exploration of the Red Army’s siege of Budapest in December 1944, in the closing stages of the Second World War. Through thirteen interlinked stories Dobozy addresses the complex legacy of the siege decades later, not only in Hungary but also in Europe and Canada.

 

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World Refugee Day 2012: An honour at a difficult time

 

June 15th 2012

 

Kevin Burns


June 20th is the day designated by the UN as World Refugee Day. We wish to acknowledge the work of one person this year who has been recognized for her service to Roma refugees in Canada: this is Gina Csanyi-Robah, Executive Director of the Roma Community Centre in Toronto. Look out for a more in depth article on Gina soon.

 

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Canadian documentary on Roma: Never Come Back!

 

April 16th 2012

 

Kevin Burns


The film’s title is a warning. It’s advice given by a Roma in Hungary to his fellow Roma in Canada who are waiting to hear about their refugee claims. If they are forced to return to Hungary, he warns, they will certainly encounter discrimination and even run the risk of violence from extremists because of their identity.

 

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Picking up the threads: Anna Torma’s Bagatelles

 

March 14th 2012

 

Kevin Burns


The visual artist Anna Torma uses the word Bagatelle in inverted commas because she says she has borrowed the word from the world of music. “It’s usually used to describe small things, not a full symphony.” An exhibition featuring her work, titled “Bagatelles” has been on display since fall, 2011 at the New Brunswick Museum in Saint John.

 

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A Fiery Soul – The Life and Theatrical Times of John Hirsch

 

January 30, 2012

 

Cover for: A Fiery Soul – The Life and Theatrical Time of John HirschReviewed by Kevin Burns


Just before the table of contents, an actor explains the pervasive influence on contemporary theatre of the Hungarian-born, Canadian theatre innovator, John Hirsch. “During the 1980s, North American actors had to bring three things to any audition: a classical piece, a contemporary piece, and a John Hirsch story.”

 

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